/page/2
shirtoid:

Cover Me! by Mandrie is available at NeatoShop

shirtoid:

Cover Me! by Mandrie is available at NeatoShop

Fin & Katie hanging in the Nordecke with @maskjuice #crew96  (at Nordecke)

Fin & Katie hanging in the Nordecke with @maskjuice #crew96 (at Nordecke)

torteen:


I hope you can take a moment out of your day to recognize this girl is killing it.

Not only is her costume amazing, but…look at the spoon! Maybe she really is Magneto…


"A girl"Seriously lazy-ass photographer and editor?

torteen:

I hope you can take a moment out of your day to recognize this girl is killing it.

Not only is her costume amazing, but…look at the spoon! Maybe she really is Magneto…

"A girl"

Seriously lazy-ass photographer and editor?

(via wilwheaton)

I don’t consider the books to be anti-authoritarian. But I do think it is important, if you think something is wrong, to question authority — because, you know, there are villains in real life, and they don’t always wear black capes and black hats. Sometimes they’re dressed like authority figures. And kids need to know that it’s important to question them.
– Author Dav Pikley’s reaction to Captain Underpants earning the number one spot as the most frequently challenged book in America. The book has topped the most challenged books list for two years now. (via npr)
tokyo-camera-style:

Ebisu
Mamiya C220 with 65mm f4.5 lens
Photographer: Hitoshi Kanzaki website / flickr / tumblr
I ran into Kansaki at Ebisu Garden Place near the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. I took a snap of his camera and we started chatting. He said he was going to Gallery Poetic Scape for the OU-en The So Books event since that was where I was headed as well we moved out and talked some more. He told me he had an exhibition at the Nikon Salon in Shinjuku in January of his street photographs-  titled Our Street View and just happened to have his portfolio from the show on him. 
You can and should check out his series on his site here: Our Street View
While he mostly shoots film (check him out on Flickr), for his Our Street View series Kanzaki attaches a small digital camera to the right handle of his wheelchair pointed ahead over his shoulder. Since the camera is slightly behind him he never knows exactly what’s framed- to add even more ambiguity to how he photographs he triggers the camera with a remote shutter release set with a two-second delay 
Each picture in this series is made at the same exact height- a comparison to Google street-view is probably inevitable but the personal diary nature of the project is there. He traverses the city and we are carried along for the ride. The sequences reflect the very act of moving around the city- a series of often non-moments that are punctuated with some interesting single images and mirrored self reflections- not to mention the stares from young children. Our Street View also includes an interesting repetitive element of the rail station attendants who assist him in and out of train cars with collapsible boards that bridge the platform gap. While he is noticed in the frames from time to time, one can’t help but feel invisible while viewing his pictures.
He shows us a world that’s obviously out there but not readily or even possibly seen by most people.  At the same time, I think Kanzaki’s wry ambivalence in attempting to advance a cause of any sort with his pictures is an important part of understanding the work. His sense of humor was apparent in the fact that his framed photographs were hung in the Nikon Salon at wheelchair level.
 

tokyo-camera-style:

Ebisu

Mamiya C220 with 65mm f4.5 lens

Photographer: Hitoshi Kanzaki website / flickr / tumblr

I ran into Kansaki at Ebisu Garden Place near the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. I took a snap of his camera and we started chatting. He said he was going to Gallery Poetic Scape for the OU-en The So Books event since that was where I was headed as well we moved out and talked some more. He told me he had an exhibition at the Nikon Salon in Shinjuku in January of his street photographs-  titled Our Street View and just happened to have his portfolio from the show on him. 

You can and should check out his series on his site here: Our Street View

While he mostly shoots film (check him out on Flickr), for his Our Street View series Kanzaki attaches a small digital camera to the right handle of his wheelchair pointed ahead over his shoulder. Since the camera is slightly behind him he never knows exactly what’s framed- to add even more ambiguity to how he photographs he triggers the camera with a remote shutter release set with a two-second delay 

Each picture in this series is made at the same exact height- a comparison to Google street-view is probably inevitable but the personal diary nature of the project is there. He traverses the city and we are carried along for the ride. The sequences reflect the very act of moving around the city- a series of often non-moments that are punctuated with some interesting single images and mirrored self reflections- not to mention the stares from young children. Our Street View also includes an interesting repetitive element of the rail station attendants who assist him in and out of train cars with collapsible boards that bridge the platform gap. While he is noticed in the frames from time to time, one can’t help but feel invisible while viewing his pictures.

He shows us a world that’s obviously out there but not readily or even possibly seen by most people.  At the same time, I think Kanzaki’s wry ambivalence in attempting to advance a cause of any sort with his pictures is an important part of understanding the work. His sense of humor was apparent in the fact that his framed photographs were hung in the Nikon Salon at wheelchair level.

 

20th-century-man:

Little Deuce Coupe: 1960’s babe and her pink 1932 Ford 3-window coupe hot rod.

20th-century-man:

Little Deuce Coupe: 1960’s babe and her pink 1932 Ford 3-window coupe hot rod.

udhcmh:

Weinland Park is Vegas fabulous.
The latest novelty sign to appear in the neighborhood.
Who is putting these up?

Someone is living my neighborhood sign fantasy.

udhcmh:

Weinland Park is Vegas fabulous.

The latest novelty sign to appear in the neighborhood.

Who is putting these up?

Someone is living my neighborhood sign fantasy.

ritaremixed:

Afternoon delight. #midwestwhip #classiccarsdaily

Bitchin’ Camaro.

ritaremixed:

Afternoon delight. #midwestwhip #classiccarsdaily

Bitchin’ Camaro.

shirtoid:

Cover Me! by Mandrie is available at NeatoShop

shirtoid:

Cover Me! by Mandrie is available at NeatoShop

Fin & Katie hanging in the Nordecke with @maskjuice #crew96  (at Nordecke)

Fin & Katie hanging in the Nordecke with @maskjuice #crew96 (at Nordecke)

torteen:


I hope you can take a moment out of your day to recognize this girl is killing it.

Not only is her costume amazing, but…look at the spoon! Maybe she really is Magneto…


"A girl"Seriously lazy-ass photographer and editor?

torteen:

I hope you can take a moment out of your day to recognize this girl is killing it.

Not only is her costume amazing, but…look at the spoon! Maybe she really is Magneto…

"A girl"

Seriously lazy-ass photographer and editor?

(via wilwheaton)

I don’t consider the books to be anti-authoritarian. But I do think it is important, if you think something is wrong, to question authority — because, you know, there are villains in real life, and they don’t always wear black capes and black hats. Sometimes they’re dressed like authority figures. And kids need to know that it’s important to question them.
– Author Dav Pikley’s reaction to Captain Underpants earning the number one spot as the most frequently challenged book in America. The book has topped the most challenged books list for two years now. (via npr)

(Source: disapocrypha)

tokyo-camera-style:

Ebisu
Mamiya C220 with 65mm f4.5 lens
Photographer: Hitoshi Kanzaki website / flickr / tumblr
I ran into Kansaki at Ebisu Garden Place near the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. I took a snap of his camera and we started chatting. He said he was going to Gallery Poetic Scape for the OU-en The So Books event since that was where I was headed as well we moved out and talked some more. He told me he had an exhibition at the Nikon Salon in Shinjuku in January of his street photographs-  titled Our Street View and just happened to have his portfolio from the show on him. 
You can and should check out his series on his site here: Our Street View
While he mostly shoots film (check him out on Flickr), for his Our Street View series Kanzaki attaches a small digital camera to the right handle of his wheelchair pointed ahead over his shoulder. Since the camera is slightly behind him he never knows exactly what’s framed- to add even more ambiguity to how he photographs he triggers the camera with a remote shutter release set with a two-second delay 
Each picture in this series is made at the same exact height- a comparison to Google street-view is probably inevitable but the personal diary nature of the project is there. He traverses the city and we are carried along for the ride. The sequences reflect the very act of moving around the city- a series of often non-moments that are punctuated with some interesting single images and mirrored self reflections- not to mention the stares from young children. Our Street View also includes an interesting repetitive element of the rail station attendants who assist him in and out of train cars with collapsible boards that bridge the platform gap. While he is noticed in the frames from time to time, one can’t help but feel invisible while viewing his pictures.
He shows us a world that’s obviously out there but not readily or even possibly seen by most people.  At the same time, I think Kanzaki’s wry ambivalence in attempting to advance a cause of any sort with his pictures is an important part of understanding the work. His sense of humor was apparent in the fact that his framed photographs were hung in the Nikon Salon at wheelchair level.
 

tokyo-camera-style:

Ebisu

Mamiya C220 with 65mm f4.5 lens

Photographer: Hitoshi Kanzaki website / flickr / tumblr

I ran into Kansaki at Ebisu Garden Place near the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. I took a snap of his camera and we started chatting. He said he was going to Gallery Poetic Scape for the OU-en The So Books event since that was where I was headed as well we moved out and talked some more. He told me he had an exhibition at the Nikon Salon in Shinjuku in January of his street photographs-  titled Our Street View and just happened to have his portfolio from the show on him. 

You can and should check out his series on his site here: Our Street View

While he mostly shoots film (check him out on Flickr), for his Our Street View series Kanzaki attaches a small digital camera to the right handle of his wheelchair pointed ahead over his shoulder. Since the camera is slightly behind him he never knows exactly what’s framed- to add even more ambiguity to how he photographs he triggers the camera with a remote shutter release set with a two-second delay 

Each picture in this series is made at the same exact height- a comparison to Google street-view is probably inevitable but the personal diary nature of the project is there. He traverses the city and we are carried along for the ride. The sequences reflect the very act of moving around the city- a series of often non-moments that are punctuated with some interesting single images and mirrored self reflections- not to mention the stares from young children. Our Street View also includes an interesting repetitive element of the rail station attendants who assist him in and out of train cars with collapsible boards that bridge the platform gap. While he is noticed in the frames from time to time, one can’t help but feel invisible while viewing his pictures.

He shows us a world that’s obviously out there but not readily or even possibly seen by most people.  At the same time, I think Kanzaki’s wry ambivalence in attempting to advance a cause of any sort with his pictures is an important part of understanding the work. His sense of humor was apparent in the fact that his framed photographs were hung in the Nikon Salon at wheelchair level.

 

20th-century-man:

Little Deuce Coupe: 1960’s babe and her pink 1932 Ford 3-window coupe hot rod.

20th-century-man:

Little Deuce Coupe: 1960’s babe and her pink 1932 Ford 3-window coupe hot rod.

udhcmh:

Weinland Park is Vegas fabulous.
The latest novelty sign to appear in the neighborhood.
Who is putting these up?

Someone is living my neighborhood sign fantasy.

udhcmh:

Weinland Park is Vegas fabulous.

The latest novelty sign to appear in the neighborhood.

Who is putting these up?

Someone is living my neighborhood sign fantasy.

ritaremixed:

Afternoon delight. #midwestwhip #classiccarsdaily

Bitchin’ Camaro.

ritaremixed:

Afternoon delight. #midwestwhip #classiccarsdaily

Bitchin’ Camaro.

"I don’t consider the books to be anti-authoritarian. But I do think it is important, if you think something is wrong, to question authority — because, you know, there are villains in real life, and they don’t always wear black capes and black hats. Sometimes they’re dressed like authority figures. And kids need to know that it’s important to question them."

About: